Graduation ceremony marks culmination of GirlTechs' project empowering young women in STEM education
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GirlTechs Project Equips Young Students with Digital Skills

ADDIS ABABA – The GirlTechs Initiative has equipped high school students with the knowledge and skills needed to thrive in the digital age.

The project, spearheaded by President Sahlework Zewdie, aimed at empowering young women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education.

In the past two months, high school students in Addis Ababa and Sebeta took part in the project supported by Coca-Cola Beverages Africa-Ethiopia (CCBA-Ethiopia) and Honeywell in Ethiopia.

Implemented by iCog Anyone Can Code, the participants underwent intensive training in computer programming and coding, facilitated by expert instructors and ICT teachers.

With the graduation of its inaugural cohort on Saturday, the project reached a milestone of empowering 1000 female high school students in Addis Ababa and Sebeta with digital skills.

The ceremony celebrates the participants’ achievements in computer literacy and coding, Through the establishment of coding clubs to carry the work forward, the GirlTechs project ensures the sustainability of its impact.

The GirlTechs vision was driven by Honeywell and President Sahle Work, who in 2019, initiated a commitment to empowering young girls in technology. Over the past three years, GirlTechs has flourished, graduating three cohorts.

The first cohort, launched at the Hope for the Fatherless Group Home and Life Training Center, provided brand new laptops and a computer lab, along with 100 hours of coding training for young learners in grades 3 to 8.

The second cohort expanded to public high schools in Addis Ababa, benefiting 500 female learners by nurturing their computer skills in coding, robotics, and game creation.

The third cohort aimed to strengthen and amplify GirlTechs’ impact by not only benefiting learners but also empowering multiple teachers and establishing dozens of coding clubs, reaching 1000 high school girls.